ENTRIES
Welcome to Eric Cheng's online journal! You are not logged in. [ Log in ]

Warty frogfish (Antennarius maculatus), Ambon, Indonesia

:: Tags: , , , ,


A pair of warty frogfish (Antennarius maculatus). The female is heavily laden with eggs.

We saw nearly 20 different frogfish while we were in Ambon, including warty frogfish, painted frogfish, striated frogfish and more. This female warty is full of eggs. You can see the tiny little male sitting on top of her.

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | no comments » | Nov 17, 2010 21:32:39

Clownfish aerates eggs, Ambon, Indonesia

:: Tags: , , , ,


A false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris) aerates and cleans her eggs next to her host anemone. Ambon, Indonesia.

Most seasoned underwater photographers are inexplicably drawn to photograph anemonefish even though they already have hundreds of pictures of them. It is extremely difficult to get an image of an anemonefish that someone else hasn’t already captured. I took this shot with the INON insect-eye lens, which allowed me to capture the tiny fish and egg patch along with the anemone and background.

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | 3 comments » | Nov 17, 2010 21:27:53

Juvenile paper nautilus in egg casing, Ambon, Indonesia

:: Tags: , , ,

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | no comments » | Nov 14, 2010 03:33:31

Coleman’s shrimp pair on a fire urchin

:: Tags: , , ,


Coleman’s shrimp pair on a fire urchin, originally uploaded by echeng.

Coleman’s shrimp (Periclimenes colmani), a beautiful commensal shrimp that lives in pairs on fire urchins (Asthenosoma varium), are fairly common in Ambon. Fire urchins are typically found here at depths of 60-90 feet, and about one out of 20 will have at least one of three kinds of commensal crustacea living on them.

Using the INON insect eye lens (Underwater Micro Semi-Fisheye Relay Lens UFL-MR130 EFS60), I was able to capture two Coleman’s shrimp in a valley of fire urchin spines. Shots taken with traditional lenses cannot capture the colorful environment in which these shrimp live.

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | no comments » | Nov 13, 2010 08:48:14

Pregnant harlequin swimming crab (Lissocarcinus laevis), Ambon, Indonesia

:: Tags: , , ,


Pregnant harlequin swimming crab (Lissocarcinus laevis), Ambon, Indonesia, originally uploaded by echeng.

The most well-known dive site in Ambon is called Laha. Laha is known as “Twilight Zone” by the folks who first dove it – and for good reason: its mucky slope is packed full of the strange and outrageous. When we came here in April of 2009, we enjoyed the site so much that we spent 6 full days diving its mucky slope.

The new moon is approaching, and everywhere in Ambon, animals have aggregated to spawn. In a single large hole in the reef, we saw 4 large stonefish fidgeting about with their heads nearly touching. Many of the critters we are finding down there are stuffed full of eggs. During a midnight dive last night, I spotted a pregnant harlequin swimming crab (Lissocarcinus laevis) hiding under some sort of tube anemone. After a few minutes, the crab walked out slowly from under her protective umbrella and extended her brood pouch – a sure sign that she was about to release eggs. After 4 minutes of gentle egg aeration, she sprang into the water column without warning, releasing all of her eggs in a few seconds of spastic gyration. This photo was taken moments before she released her eggs.

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | 4 comments » | Nov 11, 2010 22:43:11

Panda anemonefish eggs (Amphiprion polymus), Ambon, Indonesia

:: Tags: , , ,


Panda anemonefish eggs (Amphiprion polymus), Ambon, Indonesia, originally uploaded by echeng.

The Wetpixel Ambon Night Safari is underway in full force; we are doing 3 night dives each evening and are enjoying being immersed in a soup of the bizarre creatures that inhabit the waters of Ambon, including discarded diapers, tampons and other desirable subjects. Unfortunately, the nasty stuff thrown into the bay is part of what creates such an interesting underwater habitat.

Most of our group is shooting with standard macro rigs, but there are 3 insect eye relay lenses here at the resort. Julian and I are both shooting INON lenses, and Tony has a custom job from Japan. They can be incredibly frustrating to use, but successful images often describe scenes that have never before been seen. The photo in this post is a screen grab from HD video taken with my Canon 7D and insect eye lens. The main subject, a mass of eggs from a panda anemonefish (Amphiprion polymus), is normally photographed using a super-macro setup. Using an insect eye lens, I was able to capture video of both the tiny eggs and attentive parent fish. Each egg houses a late-stage baby anemonefish, an in the video, you can see tiny hearts beating and eyes moving.

echeng101110_0268858

Ambon, Indonesia | link | trackb | 1 comment » | Nov 10, 2010 23:44:53
ARCHIVES
Journal Home
Where is Eric? (password)
Stuff for Sale
February 2014 (2)
December 2013 (1)
October 2013 (1)
June 2013 (3)
May 2013 (2)
April 2013 (3)
March 2013 (1)
February 2013 (2)
January 2013 (3)
November 2012 (2)
October 2012 (3)
September 2012 (8)
August 2012 (8)
July 2012 (8)
June 2012 (8)
May 2012 (5)
April 2012 (8)
March 2012 (15)
February 2012 (7)
January 2012 (6)
December 2011 (8)
November 2011 (10)
October 2011 (12)
September 2011 (8)
August 2011 (14)
July 2011 (9)
June 2011 (9)
May 2011 (11)
April 2011 (11)
March 2011 (12)
February 2011 (23)
January 2011 (22)
December 2010 (16)
November 2010 (17)
October 2010 (26)
September 2010 (24)
August 2010 (24)
July 2010 (30)
June 2010 (26)
May 2010 (21)
April 2010 (26)
March 2010 (19)
February 2010 (17)
January 2010 (29)
December 2009 (21)
November 2009 (23)
October 2009 (32)
September 2009 (19)
August 2009 (34)
July 2009 (21)
June 2009 (30)
May 2009 (23)
April 2009 (18)
March 2009 (6)
February 2009 (25)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (6)
November 2008 (22)
October 2008 (27)
September 2008 (25)
August 2008 (34)
July 2008 (34)
June 2008 (32)
May 2008 (26)
April 2008 (15)
March 2008 (19)
February 2008 (31)
January 2008 (43)
December 2007 (33)
November 2007 (29)
October 2007 (29)
September 2007 (9)
August 2007 (19)
July 2007 (10)
June 2007 (17)
May 2007 (26)
April 2007 (38)
March 2007 (39)
February 2007 (13)
January 2007 (35)
December 2006 (35)
November 2006 (14)
October 2006 (6)
September 2006 (20)
August 2006 (24)
July 2006 (32)
June 2006 (17)
May 2006 (23)
April 2006 (16)
March 2006 (16)
February 2006 (26)
January 2006 (33)
December 2005 (17)
November 2005 (21)
October 2005 (18)
September 2005 (17)
August 2005 (5)
July 2005 (15)
June 2005 (20)
May 2005 (25)
April 2005 (7)
March 2005 (22)
February 2005 (20)
January 2005 (38)
December 2004 (6)
November 2004 (24)
October 2004 (16)
September 2004 (22)
August 2004 (12)
July 2004 (17)
June 2004 (15)
May 2004 (11)
April 2004 (35)
March 2004 (40)
February 2004 (29)
January 2004 (36)
December 2003 (20)
November 2003 (18)
October 2003 (10)
September 2003 (18)
August 2003 (10)
July 2003 (34)
June 2003 (12)
May 2003 (49)
April 2003 (42)
March 2003 (42)
February 2003 (15)
January 2003 (7)
December 2002 (17)
November 2002 (19)
October 2002 (24)
September 2002 (22)
August 2002 (20)
July 2002 (21)
June 2002 (14)
May 2002 (15)
April 2002 (11)
March 2002 (13)
February 2002 (20)
January 2002 (17)
December 2001 (16)
Even Older Journal
Travel Journals

CATEGORIES / TAGS
(25) (2) (1) (3) (1) (1) (1) (6) (2) (3) (11) (8) (3) (1) (1) (4) (2) (4) (2) (1) (6) (1) (1) (1) (6) (2) (1) (1) (1) (3) (1) (5) (1) (1) (23) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (14) (1) (10) (1) (1) (2) (1) (1) (1) (27) (6) (3) (2) (4) (4) (1) (1) (41) (11) (12) (4) (38) (1) (3) (2) (4) (1) (1) (1) (1) (2) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (10) (25) (8) (3) (2) (3) (2) (1) (5) (1) (1) (2) (1) (1) (14) (1) (5) (1) (1) (5) (43) (1) (1) (1) (3) (24) (1) (1) (1) (1) (5) (1) (4) (1) (1) (10) (1) (3) (1) (1) (1) (1) (6) (5) (1) (1) (1) (3) (1) (3) (1) (1) (1) (69) (4) (3) (7) (3) (1) (16) (6) (1) (29) (1) (7) (1) (4) (4) (4) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (10) (4) (4) (2) (1) (89) (14) (1) (2) (79) (2) (2) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (2) (3) (1) (1) (24) (3) (5) (4) (1) (2) (1)
MOST POPULAR

Eric Cheng's RSS Journal Journal RSS
Eric Cheng's RSS Journal Comments RSS

proudly powered by wordpress
script exec time: 0.89s
i hate computers.